National Day

Black Poetry Day 2021 History, Activities [October 17]

The Black Poetry Day on 17 October pays tribute to black poets of the past and present. If you are a literature lover, poet, or writer regardless of your race-you will love Black Poetry Day, where you can celebrate black heritage and history. This day celebrates the importance of black heritage and literacy. It also recognized the contributions of black poets and expressed appreciation for black writers. Black Poetry Day is a day that recognizes the contributions of black poets to literature and celebrates the black experiences recounted in poetry.

History of Black Poetry Day

This day is also to remember the birth of the first published black poet in the United States. Jupiter Hammon was born on October 17, 1711, in Long Island, New York. history.  In 1970, folk musician Stanley A. Ransom proposed that October 17 be a day to celebrate black culture and literature. Black Poetry Day was established in 1985 to commemorate the birth of Jupiter Hammon, a pioneer of black American poets, and to call attention to the literary works and achievements of African American writers.

Harmon was born in Lloyd Manor on Long Island on October 17, 1711, during the slavery period. His master, the Lloyd family, allowed him to receive some education through the Overseas Evangelism Association of the Anglican Church. Harmon used this kind of education to create poems supported by layered metaphors and symbols. In 1761, nearly 50-year-old Jupiter Hammon published his first poem titled “Evening Thoughts: Christ’s Call for Redemption and Repentance.” As a respected missionary and clerk, his poems about slavery were widely circulated. Eighteen years after his first poem was published, Jupiter Hammon published his second poem, “A Letter to Miss Phyllis Whitley”. Whitley was the first black female writer to be published, and Jupiter Harmon admired her and encouraged her with a dedicated poem.

Harmon recognized the need to support and encourage other black writers like him, especially when black writers rarely receive support from white writers. Today, there are thousands of talented black poets around the world who write down common black experiences and their own unique experiences through different forms such as written poetry, rap, and spoken poetry.

Black Poetry Day Observance and Activities

Hold a poetry slam in your living room, front steps, or lounge. Encourage the black poets you know. Attend a poetry reading session or share your own poetry. Pick some poems written by black poets. Explore the poetry of some famous black poets. When celebrating, be sure to use #BlackPoetryDay to post on social media. You can do some special tasks to celebrate the day. Here I am sharing some ideas that may be helpful to observe the day.

Support Black Poets

The day is to support the many talented black poets around you then Black Poetry Day Pick the work of a new black poet. Share the poems of your favorite African American writers. Many may donate to black literature magazines.

Hold a Poetry Reading

Let people find out unappreciated black poets by organizing poetry readings or poetry grand slams and inviting everyone you know.

Participate in the Poetry Grand Slam

If you can’t organize a poetry grand slam, you can certainly participate in one. By participating in a poetry grand slam that is predominantly black, you will diversify your reading and learn more about black experiences and traditions.

Some Works of Black Poets You Need To Read on Black Poetry Day

Black Poetry Day Paul Lawrence Dunbar
Lawrence Dunbar

Paul Lawrence Dunbar

Paul Dunbar was one of the first black poets in the United States to gain national recognition. He had already published some of his poems when he was 14 years old you may have heard or read one of his most famous poems.” The opening remarks of “sympathy”: I know the feeling of a bird in a cage, alas!

Black Poetry Day Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes (Langston Hughes) is one of the founders of the literary and artistic form known as jazz poetry-he wrote his first jazz poem “When Su Wears Red Clothes” when he was still in high school.

Black Poetry Day Gwendolyn Brooks
Gwendolyn Brooks

Gwendolyn Brooks

Gwendolyn Brooks got the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry who is the first African-American. Her collection of poems “Annie Allen” tells of an African-American girl growing up in Adult life.

Alice Walker

You may know Alice Walker from her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Purple, but Walker is not only a talented novelist; she is also a compelling poet, and her work often criticizes black women. Some of the experience.

Maya Angelo

Angelou uses her fascinating poems to open a dialogue about race, sex, oppression and the loss-her most famous poem is “On The Pulse of Morning”, which she recited at the inauguration of US President Bill Clinton in 1993 poetry.

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